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Little Fat Sheep, Monterey Park

October 7, 2009

So after our little wine excursion at the Pasadena Wine Festival and 20 minutes of listening to little kids play piano at a recital, Jess and I were starving. Maybe it was the booze talking, but I swear, we could have eaten each other if it got down to that. Lol just kidding, but yes, we were very hungry which is why we ordered like 5 hungry teenage boys going through puberty. We love going to Little Fat Sheep when it’s cold out. It’s Mongolian hot pot where you put in a random assortments of raw meat, veggies & noodles and let the broth cook the raw ingredients. I know it might sound a little insanitary, but that’s just how we roll. Oh yes, don’t ask why it’s called Little Fat Sheep, direct translation from Chinese, but the sheep part might also have to do with the Mongolian cuisine, since there are sheeps painted all over the walls….

Even though the name might not sound too healthy, this is actually one of the healthiest ways to eat Chinese food. The broth is flavored with different aromatics and you can order a plethora of vegetables or lean meat. My family loves eating hot pot during the holidays. Instead of turkey for Thanksgiving, we would bust out the pot and eat this instead. I don’t mind since I was never a big fan of turkey or stuffing, but yet again, I grew up eating Chinese food my whole life so the whole traditional holiday American dinners never appealed to me as much. Yes, call me crazy.

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We started with Green Onion Pancake which is lightly fried, crispy on the outside and layered with green onions. If you haven’t had/seen this before, ask for it the next time you are at a Chinese restaurant.

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Yes, we ordered that much food, they had to wheel it out on a cart! The waiter probably thought we were either insane or fat little piggies, probably the latter. There’s bamboo shoots, tofu, the best spinach noodles, mushroom, fish balls, napa cabbage, thinly sliced lamb meat, chicken, boy choy and daikon. Haven’t heard of these strange Chinese ingredients before?  this might help

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Cook away!

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The left is the regular soup broth and the right is the very very spicy broth. Jess is addicted to heat.

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The wonderful array of dipping sauces. I don’t know the name of all of them, but there was a peanut sauce, spicy sauce, some very skeptical looking pink sauce, and the traditional hot pot sauce.

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This is a great place for a group of people because you can feed a lot of people at once. We didn’t end up eating everything as we were totally ordering with our stomaches, but don’t worry, they let you box up the leftovers.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. October 8, 2009 3:01 am

    Sounds like a great meal!

  2. December 3, 2009 6:47 am

    I dined here the other night and I loved the spicy broth. I’ve been scouring the net trying to find a recipe for that spicy broth, to no avail. It was full of Chinese herbs and spices. Have you seen a recipe for that broth?

    • andee permalink
      December 3, 2009 7:55 am

      Hi Darrell,
      I love the broth as well, but I have no idea what goes in it besides like you said, lots of herbs and spices. I’m sure if you go to a Chinese herb store, they might be able to tell you what herbs could go in a broth to make it taste so good. Good luck!

  3. Kurt Ferrao permalink
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